The Path of the Solo Logi FC, or The Day I let one Victory get to my Head and assumed I was All-Powerful.

Reflection

It’s been rough, these past couple of months. There’s no denying it. Solo PvP ain’t a path to walk with sensitive feet, and I’m feeling the toll. It’s not just a matter of having less SP, that can be worked around by simply choosing not to engage the challenging fights. I know this, but still I fight anything that seems interesting, and it isn’t going well. I’ve been getting my butt handed to me over and over. The fights where a whole bunch of people gang up on me don’t discourage me; I know this is going to be standard for the rest of my EVE career. It’s the 1 v 1 fights that I lose which hurt the most. The constant deaths are really putting me off and I refuse to keep pushing against the brick wall and wasting ISK on my solo ships which die for no real benefit to anyone. Friends tell me that’s how you learn, by losing ships. Well, I haven’t.

This is an important point, and newbies should keep this in mind when thinking about entering the realm of PvP. Many more experienced pilots will tell you that dying makes you better. It is true to an extent, but it is mostly an encouragement, to keep your spirit from breaking against the hard face of EVE’s learning cliff. Simply flying out and dying does not make you better. You need to understand how you died and how you can lessen the chance of dying based on that knowledge. If you cannot figure these two things out, most likely you have spent your ISK in vain, unless you’re rolling in the dough and simply wanted to have some laughs. I wish I were in your position.

It can be as simple as 1. I died because I didn’t put out enough DPS and 2. I need to figure out how to get more DPS. From there, you have multiple ways to improve your next fight: acquire better gunnery/missile skills, get better ammunition, choose to orbit closer, or slower.

But what if it wasn’t your DPS, but how much you could tank? How do you decide which it was? What if it was your speed? Your transversal velocity? Your drone management? Your overheating management?

It gets wearisome when one must try consider all of this after every fight, and pinpoint the problems, only to realise that one has figured out to win a fight in the past, which probably will never happen again.

So it’s time for a change of scenery.

Solo Logi/Fleet Commanding

A Solo Logi FC (SLFC) is a term I have made up basically, and it defines a role in a fleet that is a blend of logistics and fleet commanding, as the name suggests. Basically, you’re leading your fleet whilst providing support in the form of repairs.

This means a slight alteration of the logistics ship you use. Instead of a pure logi role, you’re more of a battle logi. Here are a few fits I’ve devised to illustrate this madness.

[Navitas, Navitas FC]

Damage Control II
Upgraded Energized Explosive Membrane I
Small Armor Repairer II

Small Electrochemical Capacitor Booster I, Navy Cap Booster 400
Small Peroxide Capacitor Power Cell
Upgraded 1MN Microwarpdrive I

Small Remote Armor Repairer II
Small Remote Armor Repairer II
Small Remote Armor Repairer II

Small Remote Repair Augmentor I
Small Remote Repair Augmentor I
Small Nanobot Accelerator I

Hornet EC-300 x1

Typically, logistics ships aim to be cap stable. I ask the question, why? If they are primaried, what is the point of using up slots to maintain cap stability indefinitely? This Navitas fit is designed to be not only fast, but possessing a local repairer means it can keep itself alive. Don’t forget, most likely I will be the solo logistics ship on field on my side. The battery I fit as a whim, but it can effectively protect me from even medium neuts when combined with my cap booster.

Did I mention neuts can disable passive cap logistic ships? Well, not quite with my Navitas. Again, the cap booster can provide an injection of capacitor which, if the enemy does not have multiple neuts on me, means I have the time between neut cycles to repair my team, repair myself, or use my mobility to position myself better in a fight.

A scram would spell doom for my Navitas though, and the fit is exactly meta-shattering. It may be unorthodox, but not unheard of.

Things get a little more interesting when we move on to cruisers.

 [Exequror, Exequror FC]

Nanofiber Internal Structure II // Drone Damage Amplifier
Damage Control II
Beta Reactor Control: Reaction Control I
Energized Adaptive Nano Membrane II
Energized Adaptive Nano Membrane II
Medium Ancillary Armor Repairer, Nanite Repair Paste

Experimental 10MN Microwarpdrive I
J5b Phased Prototype Warp Scrambler I
X5 Prototype Engine Enervator
Medium Electrochemical Capacitor Booster I, Navy Cap Booster 800

Medium ‘Solace’ Remote Armor Repairer
Medium ‘Solace’ Remote Armor Repairer
Medium ‘Solace’ Remote Armor Repairer

Medium Auxiliary Nano Pump I
Medium Remote Repair Augmentor I
Medium Remote Repair Augmentor I

Hornet EC-300 x5 // Valkyrie II x5
Warrior II x5

You might be thinking it’s almost like a brawler with no guns. But this isn’t to engage. Essentially, my logi FC fits are designed to have as many possible countermeasures to enemies fire as possible, taking into account I’m the only logi on field. Most fleet logi fleets have cap stability and large buffers in mind, so that two or more logis become extremely effective, if not jammed. But if done effectively, the solo logi should frustrate enemy attempts to kill it, long enough so that a similarly sized gang with numerous logi (and hence less dps and ewar) are overwhelmed by our side’s DPS. You can see here that this Exequror packs a defensive web and scram, as well as a flight of Hornets. Overheating the scram + web can push a brawler away from me, and the hornets can disrupt another ship’s abilities to hinder my repair work. Most likely I would set these on a hostile EWAR ship. Further more, the ancillary armour repairer means that if I manage to expend all the charges, I have effectively regained HP at least equal to the bonus from a 1600mm plate, something that would require great sacrifices to otherwise fit on an Exequror.

Explaining my insanity reasons for this tactic

Firstly, the difficulty. Lots of the strengths of these logistics fits require the logistics pilot to be thinking, fast.

There’s a reason typical logi fits are designed to be as easy to pilot in terms of module management as possible. Logistics pilots already have their hands full with keeping their fleets alive, a task that can be extremely difficult in small gang fleets if the battle is scattered.

Not to mention a reason that logistics ships do not have offensive capabilities. Locking both friends and foes can be a nightmare if not properly managed, and you can end up jamming your friends and repairing the person you called out as primary. Bad, bad, bad.

There’s also a reason the FC is usually not a logistics pilot. Both are very viable primaries, but the FC is usually unknown to the enemy fleet. Making him the logistics pilot as well means being primaried leads to the removal of TWO vital fleet positions at once.

Assuming I keep my fleet repped reasonably, am not disabled by neuts or EWAR, do not repair enemies or disrupt friendlies, FC okay at the same time and am not primaried, against an equally sized fleet my fleet has:

  • More DPS ships, if they’ve fielded multiple logis
  • Enemies chasing a logistics ship that is proving harder than usual to kill
  • More fun for everyone except me because not many pilots seem to like the logi role
  • Friends (this is strictly a benefit for myself, since I’ve been a bit lonely trying to adhere to solo PvP)

Tough? Yes. But also achievable. EVE doesn’t scoff in the face of unorthodoxy, it embraces it.

1337 words.

 

 

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